Day 3, 4 and 5

With a couple of days of gales on the forecast we decided to hole Narwhal up somewhere with some good shelter and make the most of the opportunity to explore Loch Moidart by kayak and on foot. The entrance to the lock is full of rocks and makes for an exciting bit of navigating. I did my best not to be distracted by wildlife and concentrate on not steering into any rocks and Narwhal made it safely in. We stayed in the outer anchorage the first night and then with the prospect of westerly gales moved to the more sheltered pool behind Riska Island the following nights.

 Narwhal in the outer anchorage in Loch Moidart

Narwhal in the outer anchorage in Loch Moidart

 Lower part of the anchorage behind Riska Island

Lower part of the anchorage behind Riska Island

Moidart is wonderfully scenic with lots to explore, Eric even said that ‘It could be Canada if it weren’t for the castle’. And quite an impressive castle it is too. perched on it’s own island, Castle Tioram still gives the vibes of ‘I own this glen’. Dominating as it is it is impossible not to make it the first stop exploring the loch, so we duely mounted our kayak raid on it’s walls. 

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A treat the we hadn’t expected was the Silver Path, a 5km trail that runs along the shore of the loch from the castle. It is really scenic as it winds it’s way through the woods and cliffs. It reminded me really strongly of a fairy glen with it’s moss covered rocky hollows. I had spotted the Seven Men of Moidart on the ma and the head of the loch, so we set that as our goal and headed off for a pub lunch. We were quite tired, wet and hungry when we arrived at the much anticipated ‘Seven Men’, I could almost feel the warmth from the open fire and taste a pub dinner. It was slightly unfortunate when re-consulting with the map showed that, rather than being a hostelry, the Seven Men of Moidart was in fact a row of ceremonial trees, oops. Having to resort to foraging blackberries wasn’t quite the lunch that I had in mind!

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